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Garelick, H. M.: Modes of Irrationality
64,39 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 09.12.2011, Medium: Taschenbuch, Einband: Kartoniert / Broschiert, Titel: Modes of Irrationality, Titelzusatz: Preface to a Theory of Knowledge, Auflage: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1971, Autor: Garelick, H. M., Verlag: Springer Netherlands // Springer Netherland, Sprache: Englisch, Schlagworte: Philosophie, Rubrik: Philosophie // Allgemeines, Lexika, Seiten: 112, Informationen: Paperback, Gewicht: 184 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
Stand: 20.09.2020
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Modes of Irrationality
117,49 € *
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Modes of Irrationality ab 117.49 € als gebundene Ausgabe: Preface to a Theory of Knowledge. Auflage 1971. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Wissenschaft, Philosophie,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 20.09.2020
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Modes of Irrationality
69,49 € *
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Modes of Irrationality ab 69.49 € als Taschenbuch: Preface to a Theory of Knowledge. Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1971. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Wissenschaft, Philosophie,

Anbieter: hugendubel
Stand: 20.09.2020
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Conceiving the Inconceivable: A Scientific Comm...
5,49 € *
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Enlightenment in the West was predicated on the idea that the questions of the soul and God cannot be answered through reason, and therefore, we must stop asking such questions. Vedanta arrived at a different conclusion 500 years ago in the Acintyabhedabheda philosophy of Sri Chaitanya: the questions of the soul and God cannot be answered through reason, and therefore, we must answer them through devotion. The rejection of the ultimate questions, or the rejection of their rational understanding, are both unsatisfactory, and this commentary on Vedanta Sutra arises out of that dissatisfaction.It traces the problem to the nature of language: words have multiple meanings, but they cannot be applied simultaneously. Each type of meaning is instead revealed in a different context. The problem of irrationality is the contradiction between language and logic: linguistic truth is contextual, and logical truth is universal. To solve this problem, we need a modal conception of reality in which everything exists as a combination of three modes (called by various names in Vedic philosophy), but one of these modes is dominant at one time, place, or circumstance, while the others are subordinated. Logic is the change in mode priorities, and contradictory claims can be true, although not simultaneously.Thus, God, matter, and soul, are three modes, called purusa, prakriti, and jiva, and the world is created by their combination, but they cannot be known simultaneously. The soul is known when matter is subordinated, and God is known when the soul is subordinated. Knowledge is complete if three modes are used, consistent if they are not used simultaneously, and rational if logic is the process of mode change. This view of reality reconciles all previous Vedanta positions as different modes of description; hence Advaita, Visistadvaita, Dvaita, and Bhedabheda are true, but not simultaneously. Simultaneity leads to achintya or inconceivability, but non-simultaneity leads to chintya or conceivability.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 20.09.2020
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Conceiving the Inconceivable: A Scientific Comm...
5,49 € *
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Enlightenment in the West was predicated on the idea that the questions of the soul and God cannot be answered through reason, and therefore, we must stop asking such questions. Vedanta arrived at a different conclusion 500 years ago in the Acintyabhedabheda philosophy of Sri Chaitanya: the questions of the soul and God cannot be answered through reason, and therefore, we must answer them through devotion. The rejection of the ultimate questions, or the rejection of their rational understanding, are both unsatisfactory, and this commentary on Vedanta Sutra arises out of that dissatisfaction.It traces the problem to the nature of language: words have multiple meanings, but they cannot be applied simultaneously. Each type of meaning is instead revealed in a different context. The problem of irrationality is the contradiction between language and logic: linguistic truth is contextual, and logical truth is universal. To solve this problem, we need a modal conception of reality in which everything exists as a combination of three modes (called by various names in Vedic philosophy), but one of these modes is dominant at one time, place, or circumstance, while the others are subordinated. Logic is the change in mode priorities, and contradictory claims can be true, although not simultaneously.Thus, God, matter, and soul, are three modes, called purusa, prakriti, and jiva, and the world is created by their combination, but they cannot be known simultaneously. The soul is known when matter is subordinated, and God is known when the soul is subordinated. Knowledge is complete if three modes are used, consistent if they are not used simultaneously, and rational if logic is the process of mode change. This view of reality reconciles all previous Vedanta positions as different modes of description; hence Advaita, Visistadvaita, Dvaita, and Bhedabheda are true, but not simultaneously. Simultaneity leads to achintya or inconceivability, but non-simultaneity leads to chintya or conceivability.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 20.09.2020
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Modes of Irrationality
69,49 € *
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Modes of Irrationality ab 69.49 EURO Preface to a Theory of Knowledge. Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1971

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 20.09.2020
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Modes of Irrationality
117,49 € *
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Modes of Irrationality ab 117.49 EURO Preface to a Theory of Knowledge. Auflage 1971

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 20.09.2020
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Metacognition in the Rationality Debate
116,00 CHF *
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Effective decision-making relies on both feeling confident about the decision and realistically assessing its accuracy. This book presents the results of several large-scale studies of test-taking situations in which people stated their level of confidence in their answers. These judgments were internally stable and habitual across different typical and novel cognitive domains. Self-perception of the competency of the fundamental cognitive abilities predicted confidence levels; these levels were compared with the actual results, indexing the quality of Self-monitoring processes. Errors in confidence ratings were consistent, habitual, and linked with particular heuristic modes of thinking; these errors reflected the irrationality that plagues metacognitive processes. By determining the status of confidence judgments and their calibration within the cognitive/metacognitive taxonomy and their psychological determinates, this book demonstrates that both phenomena reside at the metacognitive/rational level. This book will be valuable to psychology and education professionals, and to anyone interested in understanding decision-making processes and their underlying intrapersonal factors.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 20.09.2020
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Returning to Religion
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How can one explain the resurgence of religion, even in a western context of rationality and scientific endeavour? The persistence of religious expression has compelled even diehard secularists, or proponents of the 'secularization thesis', to rethink their positions. Jonathan Benthall explains precisely why societies are not bound to embrace western liberal rationality as a socio-evolutionary inevitability. He shows that the opposite is true: that where a secular society represses the religious imagination, the human predisposition to religion will in the end break out, whether in New Age cults or in surprising, apparently secular, modes and outlets. One form of what he calls 'para-religion' is a kind of secular spirituality or secularised faux-belief that manifests itself within movements and organisations that consider themselves motivated by wholly rational considerations. Benthall uncovers a paradox: despite themselves, they are haunted by the shadow of irrationality. Drawing on the work of anthropologists such as Mary Douglas and Alfred Gell, and on current American and French scholarship which rejects precise attempts to define religion, he proposes detailed criteria by which a broad 'family resemblance' between religious movements may be identified. Acknowledging that political philosophies like Communism and Nazism, some movements in the arts, and intellectual schools such as psychoanalysis all have 'religioid' aspects, Benthall extends the argument to include humanitarianism, environmentalism, the animal rights movement and popular archaeology and anthropology. His startling conclusion is that religion, rather than coming 'back', in fact never went away. A human universal, the 'religious inclination' underlies the fabric of who and what we are: we cannot choose to repudiate it, only how to channel it.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 20.09.2020
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